mxdpi Forum : Casanova: Been there, seen that

Forum Navigation FAQSearch Profile Log inRegister
Log in to check your private messages Log in to check your private messages

Casanova: Been there, seen that

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    It's you!You are here: mxdpi Forum Index > Movies
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
chandu



Joined: 17 Oct 2005
Posts: 814

PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 2006 8:40 pm    Post subject: Casanova: Been there, seen that Reply with quote

This is a true man of legend. The iconic lover of the 18th Century, he estimated the number of his women at about 1000. His autobiography -- don't all romantics like to chronicle their conquests? -- is regarded as one of the most authentic sources of the norms and customs of life in Venice. This is a man who shared soufflé with Voltaire, ate cake with Catherine the Great, and daringly defied the Inquisition, after being held for witchcraft. Variously held as a diplomat, spy, magician and the inventor of the state lottery -- not to mention the women, Casanova is as special as subjects get.

Director Lasse Hallström, on the other hand, sees in this grand character merely an opportunity for period farce, a corsets-and-caricature run through the canals of Venice, and a structure so painfully contrived that one expects Hugh Grant to be lurking behind a gondola somewhere. His Casanova, while often inevitably reminiscent of John Madden's Shakespeare In Love, crucially lacks wit. The film also lacks verve, panache, chutzpah, spontaneity and old-world charm, but for a movie of this genre, it is the omission of wit that really smarts.

Heath Ledger plays the man of a thousand bedrooms, the charmer who makes nuns recant their faith in God, and vestal virgins rip apart birdcages with sheer lust. He joins the ranks of a peculiar selection of fine actors -- Donald Sutherland, Peter O'Toole, and even Bela Lugosi -- in the part, and, to do him credit, performs it unlike them. While his predecessors essentially delved, in degree, into the complexities of the paramour extraordinaire (Sutherland, in Federico Fellini's version, was the darkest), Heath's role here is confined to a modern rom-com standard. He grins irrepressibly through it all, and while his mask doesn't often slip, there really isn't much he can do.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    It's you!You are here: mxdpi Forum Index > Movies All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Visit the main page